Center for Risk and Crisis Management

The University of Oklahoma

University of Oklahoma, Center for Risk and Crisis Management
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Directors




Carol L. Silva

Carol L. Silva earned her PhD in political science and public policy from the University of Rochester (1998). She was previously employed by the University of New Mexico's Institute for Public Policy, the Department of Political Science and the George Bush School of Government and Public Service at Texas A&M University. She is currently a member of the faculty in the Center for Applied Social Research and the Department of Political Science at the University of Oklahoma, she also serves as the Co-Director of the Center for Risk and Crisis Management and the Center for Energy, Security and Society.

Dr. Silva's current research encompasses the intersection of a set of theoretical and methodological social science issues. She studies social valuation generally, and more specifically the translation of values into public choice. The empirical underpinnings of the social valuation and risk perception research are grounded in applied survey research methodologies and public policy analysis. The specific topics of research interest include: risk perception, environmental politics and policy; science and technology policy; climate, weather and social science, contingent valuation methodology; policy analysis; cost benefit analysis; risk analysis and assessment.

Hank C. Jenkins-Smith

Hank Jenkins-Smith

Hank Jenkins-Smith earned his PhD in political science and public policy from the University of Rochester (1985). He has been employed as a policy analyst in the DOE Office of Policy Analysis (1982-83), and previously served on the faculty of Southern Methodist University, the University of New Mexico, and Texas A&M University. He is currently a member of the faculty in the Center for Applied Social Research at the University of Oklahoma, and serves as the Co-Director of the Center for Risk and Crisis Management and the Center for Energy, Security and Society. Professor Jenkins-Smith has published books, articles and reports on public policy processes, risk perception, national security, and energy and environmental policy. He has served on National Research Council Committees focused on policies to transport spent nuclear fuel and dispose of chemical weapons, and he currently serves as an elected member of the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurement. In 2012, he gave several presentations to the Blue Ribbon Commission on America's Nuclear Future to assist in the Commission's deliberations on public acceptance of new initiatives in nuclear facility siting.

Dr. Jenkins-Smith's current research focuses on theories of the public policy process, with particular emphasis on the management (and mis-management) of controversial technical issues involving high-risk perceptions on the part of the public. He applies a variant of Cultural Theory (as advanced by anthropologist Mary Douglas and political scientist Aaron Wildavsky) to understand variations in public understanding and response to a range of societal risks, including climate change, nuclear technologies, natural disasters, radioactive materials, vaccines, and others. As part of this work he has fielded a series of national surveys since 1993 focusing on public understanding and preferences regarding nuclear security, accompanied by a more recent series (starting in 2006) focusing on energy, environmental issues, and nuclear materials management. In his spare time, Professor Jenkins-Smith engages in personal experiments in risk perception and management via skiing, scuba diving and motorcycling.


Staff


Nina Carlson

Nina Carlson

Nina Carlson is the Deputy Director of the Center for Risk and Crisis Management and the Center for Energy, Security and Society at the University of Oklahoma. She oversees the management of contracts and grants held by the Centers, and leads strategic growth activities for the Centers, as well as serving as the Centers' external liaison to public, private and non-profit groups.

Nina holds a B.A. in Government from the College of William and Mary and a Master of Public Affairs (M.P.A) from the La Follette School of Public Affairs at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. After receiving her graduate degree, Nina worked in a number of public sector positions, including as a senior policy advisor and grants coordinator to Wisconsin Governor Jim Doyle, as a senior policy analyst and federal liaison at the Wisconsin State Energy Office, and as an analyst at the Oklahoma Corporation Commission. Prior to receiving her graduate degree, Nina worked as a research assistant and associate at the American Institutes of Research in Washington, D.C. Nina's policy interests center around renewable energy and energy efficiency projects, and the intersection of energy policy with economic development interests.

Kerry Herron

Kerry Herron

Kerry G. Herron is a research scientist with the University of Oklahoma's Center for Applied Social Research, the OU Center for Risk and Crisis Management, and the Center for Energy, Security, and Society. He is an adjunct member of the Graduate Faculty at Texas A&M University and the Political Science Department at the University of New Mexico. His primary research interests include national security, energy security, and environmental security, with special focus on public opinion research of the nuclear dimensions of security and the challenges of terrorism. He has extensive experience in advanced survey research methodologies, including design, application, and analyses of national and international surveys of mass and elite publics. Since 1993, he has been a principal researcher on the most extensive longitudinal study of American views on the nuclear dimensions of security ever conducted. Kerry also studies relationships between freedom and security, and is especially interested in how normative beliefs and expectations about liberty and security evolve during and after periods of peace, war, and national crises.

Kerry is the author/coauthor of numerous published technical reports, academic articles, and the book titled Critical Masses and Critical Choices: Evolving Public Opinion on Nuclear Weapons, Terrorism, and Security (2006). He retired from the United States Air Force in 1990 as at the rank of Colonel. He is a Command Pilot with extensive experience in fighter operations, including combat in Southeast Asia. He is a distinguished graduate of the Air Command Staff College and the Air War College, and he received his Ph.D. in political science from the University of New Mexico in 1994.

Matthew Henderson

Matthew Henderson

Matthew Henderson has been providing support for internet initiatives in higher education for over ten years. For the last seven years he has focused on developing websites and web-based applications, supporting education and research in the social sciences. Since receiving a BS in journalism from Texas A&M University, he has primarily worked to advance knowledge within university settings by facilitating the communication of ideas online. Websites he administered were viewed more than one million times last year.


Affiliated Faculty


Deven Carlson

Deven Carlson

Deven Carlson earned his PhD from the University of Wisconsin-Madison in 2012. He also holds an M.P.A from UW-Madison and a BA in Political Science and Economics from St. John's University. He is currently an Assistant Professor in the Department of Political Science at the University of Oklahoma. Dr. Carlson's research agenda explores the operations of public policies and analyzes their effects on political, social, and economic outcomes of interest.  He is currently working on several projects, including analyses of the use of Twitter to respond to severe weather events.

Peter J. Lamb

Peter J. Lamb

Dr. Peter J. Lamb received B.A. (1969) and M. A. (1971, with Honours) degrees in Geography from the University of Canterbury (New Zealand), the Ph.D. in Meteorology from the University of Wisconsin in 1976, and a D.Sc. for published research in Climate Science from the University of Canterbury in 2002.

Dr. Lamb's early appointments were at the University of Adelaide (Australia, 1976-1978), University of Miami (1978-1979), and Illinois State Water Survey/University of Illinois (1979-1991). Dr. Lamb joined The University of Oklahoma in 1991 as a tenured full Professor in its School of Meteorology, and Director of the NOAA Cooperative Institute for Mesoscale Meteorological Studies (CIMMS). He received a George Lynn Cross Research Professorship in 2001, which is The University of Oklahoma's highest research honor.

Dr. Lamb's basic research focuses on the physical and dynamical processes responsible for regional climate and its short-term fluctuations (intraseasonal, interannual, decadal), especially for Northern Hemisphere Africa and North America east of the Rocky Mountains. He also is concerned with the applied issue of how such basic research can benefit society.

Justin Reedy

Justin Reedy

Justin Reedy is an assistant professor in the Department of Communication and research associate in the Center for Risk and Crisis Management and Center for Energy, Security and Society at the University of Oklahoma.

Dr. Reedy studies political communication and deliberation, mass and digital media, and group and organizational communication. In particular, his research focuses on how groups of people make political and civic decisions in online and face-to-face settings. In one of his current projects, he and his colleagues are applying theories of group communication to the context of terrorism, with the aim of building a stronger understanding of group dynamics and decision-making in terrorist cells and leadership groups. He is also working on a project examining the norms of political discussion in the United States, and how Latino immigrants in the U.S. develop their understanding of political conversation in their new society.

Dr. Reedy earned a B.S. degree from Georgia Tech in 2000, and earned a master's degree (2008) and then a Ph.D. (2013) in communication, with a certificate in political communication, at the University of Washington. Prior to graduate school, he was a media professional, working as a reporter and columnist at daily newspapers in the Atlanta area, and then as a media relations specialist and science writer for the UW Medicine system of the University of Washington.

Sam Workman


Post-Doctoral Research Associates


Kuhika Gupta

Kuhika Gupta

Kuhika Gupta is a post-doctoral research associate at the Center for Risk and Crisis Management and the Center for Energy, Security and Society at the University of Oklahoma. She received her Ph.D. in Political Science and Public Policy from the University of Oklahoma in 2013. She also holds a B.A. in Political Science from Delhi University, India and an M.A. in International Relations from the University of Warwick, UK. Her research interests include theories of the policy process and comparative public policy.

Currently, her research focuses on public perceptions regarding nuclear energy as well as the social, political, and institutional factors that influence nuclear facility siting from a global comparative perspective. In other research, she studies non-market values associated with hydropower. Her research has appeared in a number of academic journals, including Policy Studies Journal and Journal of Comparative Policy Analysis.

Joe Ripberger

Joe Ripberger

Joe Ripberger is a post-doctoral research associate at the Center for Risk and Crisis Management, the Center for Energy, Security and Society and the Cooperative Institute for Mesoscale Meteorological Studies (CIMMS) at the University of Oklahoma. He received his Ph.D. in Political Science and Public Policy from the University of Oklahoma in 2012. He also holds a B.A. in Political Science from Miami University in Oxford, OH and an M.A. in Political Science from the University of Oklahoma. Currently, his research focuses on the scientific, institutional, and social forces that influence public perceptions about, preparation for, and responses to natural and anthropogenic crises and disasters. He is also interested in the general mechanisms through which individual attention, beliefs, and emotions influence the political and policymaking process. His research has appeared in a number of academic journals, including Policy Studies Journal, Social Science Quarterly, PS: Political Science and Politics, as well as Politics & Policy.


Doctoral Research Assistants


Aaron Fister

Aaron Fister is a doctoral student in Political Science, with emphasis in Public Policy and Public Administration. He has a BA in Business Management from Iowa State University. Aaron has over 13 years experience in the Information Technology and Information Risk Management fields in the government, financial and retail industries. Aaron’s research interests include risk, security, privacy, public policy and public perceptions of risk and technology. Aaron holds CISSP, CISA and CISM security certifications.

Tyler Hughes

Tyler Hughes

Tyler Hughes is a PhD candidate in Political Science at the University of Oklahoma. Before coming to OU, he received a B.A. in Political Science at Fort Hays State University in Hays, KS and an M.A. in Political Science from Western Michigan University. Tyler is also a graduate fellow at the University of Oklahoma's Carl Albert Congressional Research and Studies Center. His research interests focus on how political factors within Congress affect the policy process at the subsystem level. Consequently, his substantive interests cover a diverse range of topics, such as energy, environmental, and health care policy. Tyler is graduate research fellow at the Center for Risk and Crisis Management and Center for Energy, Security and Society, and is involved in a number of research projects.

Mark James

Cheryl Maiorca

Cheryl Maiorca

Cheryl Maiorca is a doctoral student in Communication at the University of Oklahoma.  She holds a B.A. in Social and Behavioral Science from Linfield College and an M.S. in Emergency Management and Homeland Security from Arkansas State University.  Her studies have focused on ways households are motivated to prepare for potential disasters.  Her research interests include social influence relating to preparedness behaviors as well as organizational communication addressing how emergency management models can assist communities in being resilient when disasters strike.  Cheryl is a graduate affiliate with the Center for Risk and Crisis Management and Center for Energy, Security and Society at OU.

Sarah Trousset

Sarah Trousset

Sarah Trousset is a doctoral student in Political Science at the University of Oklahoma. Her studies have focused on Public Opinion and Policy, Risk and Policy, and Public Administration.  She holds a B.A. in Public Affairs and Administration and a Masters in Political Science from the University of Oklahoma. Her research interests include the role of expertise in the policy process and how risk, values and beliefs influence individual preferences. Sarah is a graduate affiliate with the Center for Applied Social Research, the Center for Risk and Crisis Management at OU, and the Center for Energy, Security and Society, where she actively participates in a range of funded research projects.  Sarah also serves as co-editor of the PSJ Public Policy Yearbook.


Undergraduate Policy Research Fellows


Chloe Magee

Chloe Magee

Chloe Magee is a junior at the University of Oklahoma earning her degree in Geographic Information Science (GIS) with a minor in Meteorology. Her academic interests include severe storm risk analysis, severe weather preparedness, public safety and data mapping. Chloe is an undergraduate affiliate with the Center for Applied Social Research, the Center for Risk and Crisis Management, and the Center for Energy, Security and Society, where she is participating in her first collaborative research project, which examines in depth the correlation between information transmission and tornadic weather events in hopes to increase severe weather preparedness.

Hayley Scott

Hayley Scott

Hayley Scott is an undergraduate student at the University of Oklahoma studying political science. She is currently a senior and plans to attend the University of Oklahoma College of Law next fall. Her research interests include public opinion, social media, and how both can influence public policy. In her free time, she greatly enjoys coaching freshman girls' basketball at Norman North High School, attending OU basketball games, and spending time with her family.

Wesley Wehde

Wesley Wehde

Wesley Wehde is an undergraduate pursuing a Bachelor of Arts in Economics and Public Affairs and Administration. Previously he has served as a Capitol Scholars intern at the Oklahoma State Capitol and as a Carl Albert Center Undergraduate Research Fellow. As a Research Fellow, he investigated the differences in how university presidents perceive their environment based on the type of their university. In general, his research interests include health policy and development economics and the intersection between the two. At CRCM and CES&S, Wesley's research will focus on the use of social media during severe weather events.


Alumni


Savannah Collins

Thaddieus Conner

Natalie Jackson

Michael Jones

Michael Jones

Michael Jones is currently an Assistant Professor at Virginia Tech's Center for Public Administration and Policy. Professor Jones received his PhD in Political Science in 2010 from the University of Oklahoma and holds an M.A. and B.S. in Political Science, both granted from Idaho State University. His research focuses on the role and influence of narrative in public policy processes, outcomes, design, and science communication. Professor Jones can be contacted through the Virginia Tech Center for Public Administration and Policy at http://www.cpap.vt.edu/our_faculty_staff.asp.

Matthew Nowlin

Matthew Nowlin is currently an Assistant Professor of Political Science at the College of Charleston. His research interests include theories of the policymaking process, with a substantive interest in environmental and energy policy. More specifically, he is interested in the information that used to determine how policy issues are understood—by both the public and policy elites—and the implications of those understandings for policy outcomes.  He is most interested in these dynamics in policy domains that are scientifically and technically complex, such as climate change and nuclear energy. 

Dr. Nowlin can be contacted through the College of Charleston Political Science Department at http://polisci.cofc.edu/about/faculty-staff-listing/nowlin-matthew.php 

Thomas Rabovsky

Thomas Rabovsky

Thomas Rabovsky graduated from OU with a PhD in Political Science in the Spring of 2013, and is currently an Assistant Professor in the School of Public and Environmental Affairs at Indiana University.  He has also holds a B.A. in Political Science and a Master's degree in Public Administration, both from the University of Oklahoma. His research interests include a variety of topics related to Public Policy and Public Management. These include Higher Education Policy, Performance Management, and Public Opinion. He is currently working on a series of projects that examine state politics and higher education reforms and their impacts on student outcomes. He is also interested in a variety of questions related to accountability, governance, and the role of belief systems in shaping perceptions about performance and the use of data in public management. 

Dr. Rabovsky can be reached through the Indiana Political Science department at http://www.indiana.edu/~spea/faculty/rabovsky-thomas.shtml.

Geoboo Song

Geoboo Song

Geoboo Song is an Assistant Professor of political science and public policy at the University of Arkansas.  His research interests lie in explaining risk perceptions, policy preferences and related behaviors of policy elites and the general public in various risk domains, such as vaccines, global climate change and nuclear materials. He has also been involved in policy research and practices for various public entities including IAEA, U.S. Department of Energy, Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources, Oklahoma Office of Juvenile Affairs, and Korea Nuclear Energy Foundation.

Dr. Song can be reached through the University of Arkansas Political Science Department at http://plsc.uark.edu/7232.php.


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Co-Directors

Staff

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Researchers: Post-Doctoral Research Associates

Researchers: Doctoral Research Assistants

Researchers: Undergraduate Policy Research Fellows

Alumni


Studying Risk,
Risk Perception,
& Crisis Management

An interdisciplinary research center

The CRCM is an interdisciplinary research center at the University of Oklahoma that studies risk, risk perception and crisis management in several substantive domains. The areas of research interest and expertise include energy and the environment, weather and climate, national security and terrorism, and the social dynamics surrounding complex controversial technologies.

New pathways for understanding

The CRCM seeks to develop new pathways for understanding and managing technological and environmental risks. The CRCM maintains an expanding network of affiliated researchers from other universities, national laboratories, and federal agencies to assist in both defining and utilizing new and unexpected opportunities for research and public policy analysis.

Learn more about the CRCM.